Category: In Tribute

Remember Me – A Tribute

Remember Me

Remember me when flowers bloom early in the spring

Remember me on sunny days in the fun that summer brings

Remember me in the fall as you walk through leaves of gold

And remember me in the wintertime in the stories that are told

But most of all remember Each day, right from the start

I will be forever near For I live within your heart

 

Over the Memorial holiday this year, my nieces and other family gathered in a Cemetery Chapel to remember and bury a very special mother and relative  – Carol McFarland, who had passed away peacefully  in hospice of end stage Parkinson’s Disease.  A retired teacher, Carol had always rejoiced in her love of music and her beautiful soprano voice.  On Sundays, I  attended Church of Christ services at the nursing home with her, my beloved sister-in-law,  where she loved singing gospel music. At the funeral, relatives sang a verse of Amazing Grace with the Chaplain.  I read the poem “Remember Me.”  And yes, we felt her in our hearts.

 

 

First All-Female Spacewalk During Women’s History Month

A first for women in space?

What better timing than March 29th, during Women’s History Month.

That’s when astronauts aboard the International Space Station are scheduled to conduct the first all-

female space walk.  Yes, it just so happens the astronauts venturing out together about 240 miles above

Earth are finally women – Anne McClain and Christina Koch. Women will be at the controls as well – Mary

Lawrence will serve as lead flight director and Jackie Kagey will be the lead spacewalk controller.

 

Turns out it wasn’t orchestrated to be this way.  According to NASA,  these spacewalks were originally

scheduled to take place in the fall and are meant to upgrade batteries on the space station.  Astronaut

Christina Koch noted  the importance of conducting her mission during Women’s History Month, calling

it a unique opportunity…”and I hope that I’m able to inspire folks that might be watching.”

 

Read more on the mission at https://www.washingtonpost.com/science/2019/03/07/first-all-female-spacewalk-will-take-place-during-womens-history-month/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.55ecd57027e5

For additional background on women’s history month, click on https://nationalwomenshistoryalliance.org/2019-theme-and-nomination/

 

 

It’s Time to Believe in Greatness….

This year I discovered the TV comedy The Big Bang Theory – and was saddened recently to realize that the

show’s Inspiration, British scientist Stephen Hawking had died in March at the age of 76.  I first learned

about his genius by reading his bestseller “ A Brief History of Time”  when it came out in 1988 and later

saw  the film “The Theory of Everything” in 2014.

 

Hawking was one of the world’s best-known scientists, with a talent for bringing

complex  theoretical  physics to the general public.  Hawking also was as recognized for

his wheelchair and synthetic speaking voice as for his work in the sciences.   Diagnosed with

amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease at 21, he achieved greatness

even while his condition eventually all but paralyzed him.  He also married twice and had three devoted

children.

 

Hawking was one of the figures who constantly reminded me that I had no excuses for not  realizing my

own dreams.  As we celebrate the holidays and make our resolutions for 2019, it’s always good to

remember  our challenges only make us stronger.  Dream big.

A tribute on the Passing of the Queen of Soul

As the funeral and final musical tributes to Aretha Franklin  played out in Detroit just before Labor Day,  I felt  saddened, realizing how much I will miss our city’s reigning Queen of Soul.

Aretha was only 14 when her first album hit the airwaves – I grew up with her music and will miss looking forward to powerful new performances.   It was fascinating to learn how her version of “Respect” transformed a song by Otis Redding into a powerful  anthem for women

I also realized as I listened to the coverage that Aretha flourished in an environment that was similar to my late husband Tim Robinson’s upbringing. Aretha’s love of music was nourished at her father’s Baptist church in downtown Detroit – although the family had moved north from Tennessee when she was two years old.  Tim’s father was a Baptist preacher in a small Alabama town and Tim grew up playing piano at the services from a young age.

What made Aretha so great?  She was a perfectionist and tightly controlled her performances.  But in the interviews it was emphasized again and again that she sang from her heart.  She loved her audiences and also shared her father’s devotion to furthering civil rights.  Although her marriages failed, she had four sons and fiercely protected her family’s privacy.

As tributes poured in following her death, recording artists from soul, gospel and rock and roll all over the world affirmed Aretha’s right to the title internationally of Queen of Soul.

 

 

2018 WSU Honors College Pillar Awards – And a Dean Passes the Torch

Last week I attended a very special event at the Irvin D. Reid Honors College at Wayne State University — the 2018 Pillar Awards.   I was eager to congratulate the presenter — outgoing Honors Dean, Jerry Herron (who was now listed as Founding Dean) — and to meet his successor, Dean John Corvino.  The Pillar Awards was created “to celebrate the four pillars of Honors and recognize the distinguished contributions of four exemplary individuals.”  https://events.wayne.edu/2018/06/19/honors-college-pillar-awards-76864/

While the Honors College will celebrate its 10th anniversary this year, it also includes graduates of the experimental  Monteith College, that started in 1959 and was discontinued in 1978.  As a Monteith graduate, I was delighted to meet other alums at the campus event, as well as some instructors from my era.  Retired Professor Paule Verdet was seated at my table and enjoyed recalling being one of the original instructors hired to create the curriculum of the new Monteith.

I had worked on a special project with Dean Herron a few years ago that involved creating an online platform to showcase student projects —  and I enjoyed seeing how Honors in its own way created the same hyper-creative environment for talented students from across the country that I found in Monteith.

This year’s Pillar honorees included four WSU graduates, including two from Monteth:  Sheila Cockrel was the winner of the Service Award and a Monteith alumna; and Hon. Sharon Finch, winner of the Career Award was the other Monteith graduate.   Cockrel is a former Detroit councilwoman while Finch is a retired judge – both remain active in the community.  David E. Smith was the winner of the Community Award, and  James Linwood Smith was named posthumously as the winner of the Research award.

There were also recent Honors graduates at the event, who were inspired by the Pillar Awards honorees.  As the Detroit area continues to reinvent itself, it is exciting to see this new generation helping to ensure a bright future.

For more information:   https://honors.wayne.edu/experience

 

The Art of Career Growth in Journalism

After years of visiting with my late husband Timothy Robinson’s  family in Birmingham, Alabama each

March as we attended the annual  Robinson Forum together  at Samford University,

I was unable to book a flight this year because of complications in locking in a speaker  far enough in advance.  So I

watched a live feed instead here in Michigan at https://www.facebook.com/SamfordJMC/.  While I plan on flying

south later this spring or summer to visit the Robinson family,  I will miss being able to talk to the guest speaker,

always a formidably talented journalist – this  year, Roy S. Johnson, columnist and director of content  development

at AL.com/The Birmingham News.

 

Johnson, one of the early pioneers among black journalists to work at mainstream national publications

– in his case starting in the 70s as a sports writer at  Sports Illustrated and Fortune Magazine, both

published by Time Inc. —  he is currently enjoying shaping news coverage at a Birmingham, Al

newspaper.  He challenged Samford journalism students to constantly challenge the breath of their

talents – for instance, not staying only focused on one area, like sports.  His journalism resume not only

includes stints as assistant managing  editor at Sports Illustrated, but vice president and edit-in-chief of

Men’s Fitness magazine, editor-in-chief of History Channel  magazine and staff writer at the New York

Times.  He also has experience producing national TV and radio content for Sport Illustrated and he has

co-authored biographies with Avery Johnson, Charles Barkley and Earvin (Magic) Johnson.

 

It reminded me that when I knew Tim, he was a pioneer in legal journalism, with a degree from Yale Law

School – after developing his talent as an investigative reporter for UPI covering the civil rights

movement in his home state of Alabama, then as an editor and  investigative reporter at the

Washington Post.  He ended his career by jumping into the dotcom boom, developing editorial

content for news websites Exite, Alta Vista and AOL.  Tim also pushed me to take the leap into becoming

communications director for new online media sites covering the Asian American community.   After his

death, I even found the courage to take on the task of being development director of a sports non-

profit.  I hope the Samford students this year heed that call to constantly test their talents – it’s a

challenging and exciting way to keep growing.